Posted By Sandra Alland

Here's a link to a little piece I wrote about the lovely and amazingly talented Tracy Wright, who passed away yesterday. Peace, sister.

xo


 
Posted By Sandra Alland

Happy new year!

My dear friend M recently told me that visual artist and actor ed fielding passed away. This is the last I saw of ed; he was briefly a co-parent of my also dearly departed hedgehog, Looloolooloo, when I moved to Scotland. Perhaps they are hanging together in the afterlife...

ed and lulu

I remember dancing with ed at Theatre Passe Muraille, and he was weird and wonderful to work with in a play I co-wrote and took to the New York Fringe in 2002. I dug up a few old reviews of the show, because of course ed always got a mention! Here's a spot-on summary of him: "Another highlight is a surreal moment captured by the enigmatic, Fellini-like persona of ed fielding (spelled in lower case). He plays the Waiter who lip synchs to a pre-recorded message on a hand-size tape player the synopsis of the story we are about to see. His long, wiry body; his deep, luring, monotone voice; and his frizzled eyebrows sprouting from his narrow head add a sense of intrigue and wonderment to his speech." (nytheatre.com). More reviews here.

Rest in peace, ed. For those of you on Facebook, you can visit a page for ed here.

In other losses, Edinburgh lost one of its last indie DVD rental shops, quietly and suddenly, just before the holidays. It seems the amazing Euro Films has closed its doors. Obtaining foreign and independent films just got even more difficult...

xo


 
Posted By Sandra Alland

Thanks to everyone who came to visit me at the Meadows Festival today, and to B and M for sharing their stall with me. Here are some pics... B presented the "smallest theatre ever" and it was crackin. If only all actors were so cooperative...


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Posted By Sandra Alland

Last night I rented Ari Folman's stunning and shattering Waltz With Bashir, an animated documentary about the devastation of the 1982 Lebanon War. It's one of the best films I've seen in a long while, though it left me drained. An Israeli soldier suddenly regains his memory after 20 years and has to come to terms with a devastation he helped bring about. The film is a rare glimpse into the confusion and ignorance of young soldiers sent into battle without the slightest clue of who they are trying to kill or why.

In other news, this Thursday 9 April, Zorras play Muse-Ic at The Bongo Club with Ex-Men and Shell-Suit Massacre. It should be a swell night of spoken word bands. Only £5/4, starts at 9pm.

Friday at 8pm is the launch of the latest issue of Lock Up Your Daughters in Glasgow, a great wee zine of queer women's stuff. There's an interview with Zorras in this issue, too! The Flying Duck, 142 Renfield Street.

In still other news, I saw a short theatre piece collated and directed by Stef Smith, Breaking Binary. It was part of Queen Margaret University's presentations, and explored gender variance and transsexuality through several monologues by various writers. A very brave piece to do in Edinburgh, kudos to Smith for that! The piece was visually quite stunning -- different images were created using plastic wrap to divide the space (and performers), and the audience sat on all four sides of the stage. Some of it was bit heady and didactic -- it was hard to know who the intended audience was... I think this a wonderful introduction for non-genderqueers or people not aware of the issues, but perhaps slightly preaching to the converted otherwise. Also it was occasionally confusing in terms of who was talking and when we were listening to a new character -- though I personally love pieces that are not 100% clear and spelled out, this can be problematic with issue-based work if the director wants to say something specific. Overall the piece featured good performers, fairly solid writing, and imaginative direction!

xox

SA


 
Posted By Sandra Alland

"One way of looking at speech is to say it is a constant stratagem to cover nakedness."- Harold Pinter

I was sad to hear Harold Pinter had left this world...his plays and his mouthiness will always inspire me.

“The invasion of Iraq was a bandit act, an act of blatant state terrorism, demonstrating absolute contempt for the concept of international law.” - Harold Pinter

SA  


 

 

 
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